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Bake a Batch of Gingerbread Icebox Cookies for Your Pup This Holiday Season

The way to a dog’s heart? With homemade cookies! And we have just the pet-safe, pup-approved holiday cookie recipe that also makes for a fantastic gift for all their furry friends this holiday season: Gingerbread Icebox Cookies.

Created by cookbook authors and co-founders of Trunk Pop Dinners Marge Perry and David Bonom, these fruit-studded gingerbread cookies are a dog-friendly take the classic icebox cookie, which—fun fact!—originated in the ’20s when homes had iceboxes instead of refrigerators. In addition to an assortment of dried fruits, these classic cookies typically feature different kinds of nuts, like pistachios and cashews; but for our doggie-delicious cookies, we made a few tasty (and healthy) changes.

For starters, we ditched the nuts because they’re simply not safe for pups (you’re welcome!). And to give the cookies a holiday twist, we found the perfect cookie toppers for these sweet treats: Wellness Pet Company’s Old Mother Hubbard Winter Fun P-Nuttier dog treats. Simply whip up a quick batch of dog-friendly icing (we’ve provided that recipe, too), press on the Christmas tree-, snowflake-, stocking-, and star-shaped treats, and you have yourself the prettiest batch of cookies worth gifting to all your pet parent friends.

Let’s bake!

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Ingredients

Gingerbread Icebox Cookies BeChewy

1 1/2 cup whole wheat flour

1/2 cup Wellness Complete Health Adult Deboned Chicken + Oatmeal Recipe Dry Dog Food, finely ground in a food processor

1 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon ground ginger

1 large egg

1/3 cup peanut butter

1 tablespoon molasses

1 tablespoon real maple syrup (do not substitute imitation maple syrup as it can contain Xylitol, which is toxic to dogs)

1 teaspoon grated ginger

1/2 cup pet-safe chicken broth

3/4 cup of dried and/or freeze-dried fruits, chopped into larger chunks (including kiwi, papaya, strawberries)

Handful of Old Mother Hubbard Winter Fun P-Nuttier Crunchy Dog Treats as cookie topper

1 ounce Neufchâtel cheese, softened (optional, for icing)

Natural food coloring, like McCormick Nature’s Inspiration Food Colors (optional, for icing)

🛒 Download Printable Shopping List

Supplies

Gingerbread Icebox Cookies BeChewy

Food processor

Hand mixer

Mixing bowls

Measuring cups and spoons

Sushi rolling mat (optional)

Knife

Baking sheets

Parchment paper

Piping bag and tips (optional, for icing)

Gingerbread Icebox Cookie Instructions

Gingerbread Icebox Cookies BeChewy

Yield:
12-24 cookies

Serving size:
1/2 treat

Prep time:
45 minutes

Cook time:
15 minutes

1.Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

2.Combine the ground Wellness dog food and flour in a bowl. Stir in the cinnamon and ground ginger.

3.In a second bowl, lightly beat the egg with a fork. Add the peanut butter, molasses, maple syrup, grated ginger, and chicken broth; and stir until well-combined.

4.Stir in the dried fruit.

5.Stir in the dry mixture. Once the ingredients are well-combined, knead the dough until the mixture holds together. Roll into a 15-inch-long log that is about 2-inches in diameter. Place the log(s) on the baking sheet and refrigerate at least 30 minutes (overnight if you can!).

For perfectly round cookies, use a sushi rolling mat to roll the dough! (Trust us, it’s a game-changer.)
🥣 baking tip:

6.While the dough chills, preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

7.Cut the log into as many 1/2-inch-thick slices as you want to bake. (Wrap the remaining dough and refrigerate.)

For a more elegant look, use cookie cutters, like a scalloped cookie cutter, after slicing each cookie.
🥣 baking tip:

8.On half of the batch, lightly press one Old Mother Hubbard Winter Fun P-Nuttier Crunchy Dog Treats into the center of each cookie. Mold the cookie around the treat so it stays put.

9.Place the slices on the prepared sheet pan and bake 15–17 minutes, until they feel firm when tapped.

10.Allow the cookies to cool completely on the pan—and enjoy!

These cookies look—and taste—even better when decorated with dog-friendly frosting. Keep scrolling for the easy icing recipe.
🥣 baking tip:

Dog-Friendly Icing Recipe

Gingerbread Icebox Cookies BeChewy

1.Mix cornstarch and water in a bowl until dissolved.

2.Add softened Neuchâtel cheese and beat with a hand mixer on medium until smooth.

3.Add food coloring to mixture*. If you want white icing with colorful accent, pour some of the prepared icing into a smaller bowl and just tint that amount.

4.Allow to sit at room temperature while the cookies bake, or chill if making icing well in advance.

*Note about food coloring:We advise using a natural food coloring, which is pet safe.

Other Dog-Safe Fruits to Add to Your Icebox Cookies

Gingerbread Icebox Cookies BeChewy

What makes this Gingerbread Icebox Cookie recipe so great? It’s versatility!
This icebox cookie recipe is a fantastic base recipe that you can use year-round. For example, in the spring, embrace more seasonal fruits such as fruits, like kiwi, cherries, and apricots. And in the summer, sprinkle in some dried apples, blueberries and raspberries. Or, simply want to treat your pup to gingerbread icebox cookies sans fruit? Leave ’em out!

Other safe dried fruits to include:

Apples
Apricots
Blueberries
Cherries
Cranberries
Dates
Mango
Nectarines
Prunes
Raspberries
Strawberries

    Ingredients to avoid:

    Nuts
    Raisins
    Candied fruits

    How to Gift These Gingerbread Icebox Cookies

    Remember when we said these Gingerbread Icebox Cookies make for great gifts? We weren’t kidding.
    Here are some festive ideas on how you can wrap them up and gift to all your favorite people’s pets this holiday season.

    Box Them Up

      Gingerbread Icebox Cookies BeChewy

      Neatly pack a holiday tin with a variety of decorated cookies.

      Bag Them Up

      Gingerbread Icebox Cookies BeChewy

      Pack one or two icebox cookies in clear cellophane baggies.

      Bundle Them Up with Ribbon

      Gingerbread Icebox Cookies BeChewy

      No gift bag, no gift box—no problem. Stack a few cookies, wrap them with festive string or ribbon, and pass them out.

      Don’t Forget the Gift Tag

        Gingerbread Icebox Cookies BeChewy

        Keep track of who gets what with a handwritten gift tag. Better yet, write them—and their pup—a heartfelt note!
        We hope you treat your very good boys and girls to holiday treats this year and beyond with our pet-safe holiday cookie recipes for dogs. What we love about this recipe is how it can be used year-round. Don’t save them for the holidays!

        To ensure proper food safety, refrigerate prepared cookies and consume within 3-4 days or transfer to a freeze-safe container and store for up to 1 month.

        These recipes were reviewed by a veterinarian. They are intended as a treat or snack. These treats should not be fed to dogs that have diabetes or other blood sugar issues, and should be consumed in low-moderate amounts by overweight dogs. Treats should only constitute a small percentage of your pet’s daily food. Feeding too many treats can lead to nutrient deficiencies. If your pet has health issues (including sensitivities to fats) or if you have any concerns, consult your pet’s veterinarian before offering these food items.

        The post Bake a Batch of Gingerbread Icebox Cookies for Your Pup This Holiday Season appeared first on BeChewy.

        Can Dogs Eat Pumpkin Seeds? Everything You Need to Know

        Ah, fall: The time of year where we sip our Pumpkin Spice Lattes (or, more commonly known as PSLs) on the way to work and spend our weekends carving pumpkins and baking pumpkin seeds. But before you clean out some pumpkins and treat your pup to the seeds, there are some safety tips you should know. Because, while raw pumpkin seeds are safe in moderation, they’re not as healthful as you might think.

        We spoke with Dr. Sarah J. Wooten, DVM, a veterinarian at Sheep Draw Veterinary Hospital in Greeley, Colorado, to get the facts about pumpkin seeds for dogs. Turns out, not all the health benefits touted on the internet—including parasite prevention, allergy relief, and anti-inflammatory benefits—are true.

        Can Dogs Eat Pumpkin Seeds?

        The short answer is yes, dogs can eat fresh pumpkin seeds in moderation. But while superfood pumpkin seeds pack a nutritional punch for humans (they’re also rich in antioxidants, magnesium, iron, zinc, and other nutrients), the same can’t be said for your pup (more on that later). So, if they snag a few off the floor, don’t stress. But all that cleaning, roasting, and grinding to add pumpkin seeds to dog food and treats? Don’t bother.

        Dogs can, however, eat pumpkin puree and pumpkin pulp. A small amount of pureed pumpkin can be added to your dog’s daily diet. Doing so can help your dog maintain a healthy weight because the fiber in pumpkin can help your dog feel fuller for longer. Of course, always check with your dog’s veterinarian before changing their diet.

        As for pumpkin pulp, it’s naturally high in antioxidants beta-carotene and lutein that support eye health and healthy skin and coat. Not only is pumpkin pulp also rich in potassium, Vitamin C, and Vitamin E, but it’s also particularly high in Vitamin A.

        Are Pumpkin Seeds Healthy for Dogs?

        Pumpkin seeds are safe for dogs in moderation—but not exactly healthy, according to Dr. Wooten.

        • Dogs don’t digest seeds the same as humans. “While people eat pumpkin seeds for the benefits (vitamins, minerals, and fiber), those nutrients aren’t available or beneficial to dogs,” Dr. Wooten says. “If you think about it, dogs’ guts aren’t really set up to digest seeds, and it isn’t a part of their natural diet.”
        • Pumpkin seeds don’t kill worms or parasites. This is a false promise made in other articles about pumpkin seeds for dogs. “If you feed your dog large amounts of pumpkin seeds, they may pass some worms because they develop diarrhea,” says Dr. Wooten, “but it isn’t an effective or humane way to treat worms.” Instead, consult with your vet, who can recommend the correct dewormer medication. “Furthermore, if a person feeds pumpkin seeds believing they will eliminate worms, the dog will continue to be infested with worms and suffer the side effects,” Dr. Wooten says.

        So, can you feed pumpkin seeds to your dog? Sure, in moderation. But they don’t provide the same kind of healthful benefits as, say, blueberries, apple cider vinegar, sweet potatoes, or even canned pumpkin. In fact, they don’t offer any healthful benefits for dogs at all, according to Dr. Wooten.

        Risks of Feeding Too Many Pumpkin Seeds to Your Dog

        The biggest thing to know is that pumpkin seeds are hard for dogs to digest.

        “Large amounts could cause stomach upset, constipation, or diarrhea,” says Dr. Wotten.

        How to Feed Pumpkin Seeds to Dog

        If you want to feed a couple of pumpkin seeds to your pup so they don’t feel left out of family baking time, we get it. But here’s what Dr. Wooten says you should keep in mind:

        • Check for pumpkin seed allergies. Give your dog a couple of seeds and see how they do. If they experience any negative side effects—think diarrhea, loss of appetite, vomiting, or abdominal pain—stop feeding them pumpkin seeds immediately and call a vet.
        • Remove the shells. Shells are choking hazards and indigestible for dogs. Dr. Wooten suggests boiling or rolling shelled pumpkin seeds to separate the seed from the shell.
        • Properly roast pumpkin seeds. No oil, salt, or other spices should be added when feeding pumpkin seeds to dogs.
        • Grind pumpkin seeds into a powder for optimal digestion. This reduces risk of intestinal obstruction or irritation.
        • Serve small amounts and in moderation. While pumpkin seeds are safe for dogs—aka, don’t freak out if Fido eats one or two off the floor—overdoing it can cause issues. Small dogs can safely consume three to five seeds; medium dogs five to 10 seeds; and large dogs 10 to 20 seeds within one day.

        Have more questions about your pet’s behavior? Get expert advice through Chewy’s Connect With a Vet service, available daily from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. ET.

        Pumpkin Recipe for Dogs

        Just because you’re skipping the seeds doesn’t mean you can’t treat your pup to a delicious fall treat. Our recipe developers created a dog-friendly version of everyone’s favorite fall drink: the Pumpkin Spice Latte, or PSL. Get the recipe here!

        Best Dog Treats with Pumpkin

        Don’t feel like baking? No problem. Chewy sells plenty of pumpkin-infused and pumpkin-flavored dog treats. Here are some of the most popular among shoppers.

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        A Perfect Pairing

        Boasting two favorite fall flavors, these Health Bars from Blue Buffalo are made with real pumpkin and cinnamon. Plus, they’re packed with good-for-pups omegas and antioxidants that help promote a healthy immune system and encourage healthy skin and a shiny coat.

        See Details

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        Add Blueberries

        Pumpkin and blueberries? You better believe pups love it. Fruitables’ Pumpkin & Blueberry Dog Treats not only taste great, but they smell great, too. Oh, and did we mention each treat is only 8 calories? Talk about guilt-free.

        See Details

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        Bear-y Tasty

        What’s so great about Charlee Bear’s Grain-Free Chicken, Pumpkin & Apple Dog Treats? They’re made with real, wholesome ingredients; meaning, there are zero artificial colors or flavors. And what’s not to love about that?

        See Details

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        Pumpkin And Duck

        Yes, you read that right: These grain-free Hill’s treats pair pumpkin with all natural, real duck–the treat’s No. 1 ingredient.

        See Details

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        Hand-Crafted Pumpkin Biscuits

        Because Portland Pet Food Company’s Pumpkin Biscuits are twice-baked, they make for a light and crunchy treat. Plus, they’re free of artificial flavors.

        See Details

        Frequently Asked Questions

        Q: What happens if a dog eats a pumpkin seed?

        A: Nothing, as long as they’re not allergic and pumpkin seeds are eaten in moderation.

        Q: Can dogs have pumpkin seeds in the shell?

        A: No, dogs cannot have pumpkin seeds in the shell, as shells are indigestible. Be sure to remove and dispose of shells safely before feeding pumpkin seeds to dogs.

        Q: How many pumpkin seeds can a dog eat at once?

        A: Small dogs can safely consume three to five seeds; medium dogs five to 10 seeds; and large dogs 10 to 20 seeds within one day.

        Q: How can you tell if a dog is allergic to pumpkin seeds?

        A: Look for negative side effects such as diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, or abdominal pain.

        So, to wrap things up, don’t believe everything you read on the internet, folks. While pumpkin seeds are safe for dogs in moderation, they don’t provide any nutritional benefit. For that reason, forgo making unnecessary messes in the kitchen to prepare pumpkin seeds for dogs. There’s really no point. Hey, that just means more for you, right?

        The post Can Dogs Eat Pumpkin Seeds? Everything You Need to Know appeared first on BeChewy.

        Your Pet Can Embrace the Barbiecore Trend, Too, With These Hot Pink Must-Haves

        Very Peri might be the Pantone color of the year, but hot pink is getting all the love right now.

        Barbiecore, which embraces all shades of pink, including hot pink, is capturing the attention of everyone from TikTokers (the hashtag #barbiecore is trending on TikTok with more than 18 million views) to celebs, like Lizzo and Anne Hathaway, rocking the Millennial-pink-on-steroids hue. And we, of course, have one highly publicized—and highly anticipated—film to thank for the Barbie renaissance: Greta Gerwig’s 2023 film of the same name, “Barbie.” Plus, did you know that this year marks the 60th anniversary of the iconic Barbie Dreamhouse?

        Celebs and influencers are far from the only people to embrace the trend, though. Barbiecore has seeped into the world of interior design, too, with decorators dreaming up all sorts of creative, fun, and whimsical ways to weave pink into our homes. And pets’ rooms—and their wardrobes!—are no exception.

        Ahead, we’ve gathered some ways pet parents—like you—can incorporate the Barbiecore aesthetic into your pet’s life, from hot pink toys, bowls and beds to leashes, dresses and more.

        Barbiecore Pet Beds

        Let your pup or cat lounge in style with an elegant pink sofa bed. Or, for something a little cozier, how about a calming fleece-covered bed in cotton candy pink? For a subtler shade of pink, Frisco sells an elevated sofa bed in blush pink that embraces not one but two hot trends (the other being the curved furniture trend, a la Pinterest).

        Barbiecore Pet Clothes

        For the Barbiecore trend, go for all shades of pink, from blush floral dresses and personalized pink sweaters to hot pink hoodies and raincoats.

        Barbiecore Pet Toys

        Let ’em chew in style with these pink toys.

        Barbiecore in the Kitchen

        That’s right, you can take the trend into the kitchen, too, with Barbiecore dog bowls, food storage containers and more.

        Barbiecore on the Go

        Don’t overlook your pup’s leash, collar, and harness! Turn heads on your daily walks with these on-trend on-the-go accessories. And for longer trips? Consider pink-ifying your travel accessories, too.
        Come on, Barbie, let’s go pawty.

        The post Your Pet Can Embrace the Barbiecore Trend, Too, With These Hot Pink Must-Haves appeared first on BeChewy.

        How Do You Mourn the Loss of a Pet? Any Way You Want, Says “Good Grief” Author E.B. Bartels

        LLosing a pet hurts—really, really hurts. And it can be hard to share that pain with others, because we humans often aren’t as comfortable talking about grieving a pet as we are discussing grief for the other important friends and family in our lives. So how do you grieve a pet who’s passed away? The answer, says E.B. Bartels, author of “Good Grief: On Loving Pets Here and Hereafter,” is as unique and personal as your relationship with the pet who’s gone.
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        “There’s no guidebook for pet death in the way you’d lean on culture or religion to know the steps to take when a person dies,” Bartels explains. That can leave some pet parents feeling lost and confused when their pet is gone—but it also gives pet parents the freedom to choose the most fitting way to honor their beloved friend.

        When it comes to mourning pets, Bartels has been there. Throughout her life, she’s had many pets—and that means she’s had to say goodbye to many pets, too. Turning through the pages of her book, you get to meet all of Bartels’ numerous pet friends, from childhood into adulthood—from a finch named Kiki to Gus and Gwen, two Cairn Terriers—and learn how each held a special role in her life, and how each death left its mark on her heart.

        To be clear, Bartels will be the first to tell you that she’s no grief expert; she’s someone who has simply had a lot of pets, and therefore dealt with a lot of their passings, learning something new about what it means to grieve with each goodbye.

        Still, she never planned to write this book, she explains. It wasn’t until grad school when she found herself penning essays on beloved animals that a friend pointed out the varying ways pets are laid to rest or mourned. Bartels began researching and discovered that when it comes to honoring dead animals, there’s no “right way”—and the options are endless.


        “I fell into this black hole of learning about all the different and amazing things that people do when their pets die to mourn and remember them,” she says. “When a pet dies, I think it’s sort of amazing that you don’t have any restrictions. You can do things like have a funeral service, or buy a burial plot, and also have your animal cloned, or taxidermied, or have a portrait painted of them.”

        Each memorial, Bartels realized, is driven by a sincere and deeply felt love for the pet. Yes, it’s sad, she acknowledges, but the bond evident in each unique gesture of love is also inspiring.

        As your pet’s closest companion, you know how best to honor their passing. But if you’re having trouble deciding on the perfect memorial, “Good Grief” has plenty of inspiration for you.

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        Bartels interviewed dozens of pet parents who opted for anything from burials in a pet cemetery to cremation to cloning and even mummification (yes, it’s still a thing). But you don’t have to go big for your memorial to be meaningful. For example, grieving pet parents often turn to photos as a way to begin processing their feelings, Bartels says. “I’ve heard of a lot of people combing through their camera rolls to make a photo album book or have prints made to frame and display around the house. I think it’s such a nice way to remember a pet.”

        If it’s too difficult for you to see a framed print in your home all the time, sorting through memories for a social media tribute post can be cathartic.

        Should I Get Another Pet?

        Some pet parents need a long grieving period before they’re ready to welcome a new pet into their lives, Bartels says. For others, caring for a new pet helps them move through their pain. The only right answer is the one that feels right to you. Just remember to keep taking your responsibilities as a pet parent seriously. If you feel ready to welcome a new pet into your life, ask yourself these questions first.

        Another common option she’s seen used are memorial spaces—whether or not that place is in the backyard or elsewhere.

        “Many people I spoke with will have a rock or marker made, sometimes plant a bush or some flowers, and create a little space where they can go and sit and remember their pet.” You could also choose a spot inside the home, such as a shelf where a pet’s ashes are displayed.

        “I think holding a physical space for memories is really important,” says Bartels.

        When putting together her book, Bartels not only spoke with parents to discover new and familiar ways they choose to mourn their pets, but she also turned to psychologists and grief counselors who tackle these heavy topics for a living. One thing that kept coming up during her conversations with experts is that grief doesn’t necessarily get easier with time—in fact, for many, the weight of grief can compound with each loss. But she also learned that through these heartbreaking experiences comes resilience, and “you can learn tools to help yourself move through grief — and to take care of yourself while you’re moving through it,” she explains.

        If you’re not sure where to start, Bartels has some go-to advice for how to deal with grief associated with the loss of a pet that may help you when the time comes. Just remember: There is no one way to mourn the loss of a pet — nor one singular way to celebrate their life, so let yourself do what feels right when dealing with pet grief.

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        • Don’t give yourself a time limit. Grief is not linear. It can come in waves, so don’t put pressure on yourself to be “over it” by a certain time, and allow yourself to be upset if something brings your grief back up to the surface months or years later.
        • Be kind to yourself. Whether you’re dealing with your first loss of a pet or your twentieth, pain is pain. You must allow yourself to feel it. Remember that it’s natural to miss your pet—as “Good Grief” points out, people have been grieving and honoring their beloved animals for centuries.
        • Find your support system. Lean on friends or family who understand what you’re going through. You may also find pet death support groups and hotlines helpful. The Association for Pet Loss and Bereavement has a listing of support groups both online and in-person, as well as grief counselors for one-on-one support.

        Here’s the good news: You’re not alone, and pet parents who are grieving now have more support than ever. So do whatever you need to do to manage your grief, and when you’re ready, memorialize your beloved pet in the way that feels right to you. As Bartels puts it in “Good Grief”:

        “Just because an animal is gone, even if its death is long in the past, that doesn’t mean that pet isn’t part of you. It doesn’t mean that the experience of having that pet didn’t profoundly change you, or make your life better, or help you become a stronger, happier person. And even if it’s been six years, thirteen years, a whole lifetime, those animals still deserve to be honored and remembered.”

        Helping Others Through Pet Loss

        If you know someone who’s struggling with the loss of a pet, there’s one big thing you can do to help, Bartels says: Take their grief seriously. ”Do the same things you’d do for someone who had lost a beloved human,” she explains, such as:

        • Offer to cook a meal or pick up take out so the grieving person doesn’t need to worry about dinner one night.
        • Send flowers or a card.
        • Share memories you have of the animal.

        Your goal is to show them that they aren’t the only one who is sad about the loss—that their pet was loved by many and will be missed.

        The post How Do You Mourn the Loss of a Pet? Any Way You Want, Says “Good Grief” Author E.B. Bartels appeared first on BeChewy.

        Stylish Ways to Take Your Pet to Work This Fall

        As the office beckons us to return to in-person meetings, 2022 style means we are “goodbye” to WFH loungewear and “hello” to more polished work outfits—complete with our pet in tow for those of us lucky enough to work in dog-friendly offices (like Chewy!). And according to recent studies, an increasing number of pet parents are bringing their furry loved ones along with them to work: Not only have 60 percent of surveyed pet parents previously left a job because it did not allow them to bring their pet to work, but 70 percent also said they’d accept lower pay to land a pet-friendly job—and that’s saying something.

        We talked to two pet style experts— Dara Foster, a New York-based renowned pet style expert, author, and former fashion stylist; and Zach Drouin, dog parent to a fashionable and travel-loving teeny white maltipoo dog influencer living in New York City named Mochi (aka Mochi and the City)—to find out what cat and dog carriers are on-trend this fall and how you can coordinate with your furry friend without sacrificing your own personal style, whether you’re in the office or on-the-go.

        Pair Unisex Slings with Genderless Outerwear

        pet carrier fashion

        Photo: Chewy

        “It’s been really interesting to see that as work attire has become more casual—with more people doing hybrid or remote work—pet carrier bags have become more casual,” says Foster. “Dog dads are really embracing pet carriers for both cats and dogs, and items are much more unisex as they bring in their pets to work.”

        Foster would know. She has written her blog PupStyle.com for over a decade, as well as five children’s books about dogs, including “PupStyle: When I Grow Up,” which features dogs styled as different career professions that kids can learn about and aspire to.

        This unisex trend isn’t limited to pet wear, either. Genderless style has been on the rise for years and was all over the fall and winter 2022 runways with tuxedo trends, classic white tanks, and playful trenches, according to Harper’s Bazaar.

        For those of you heading into the office this fall and winter, add some sophistication to your autumn wardrobe that matches your pet’s au courant nonbinary style with a tuxedo-style smoking jacket or an oversized trench.

        We Love… FurryFido’s reversible unisex carrier sling, which also comes in a neutral grey hue. It’s ideal for cats or dogs under 13 pounds who can stay nestled next to pet parents as they break for coffee.

        Shine Bright with Fluorescents

        stylish pet carrier fashion

        Photo: Chewy

        After a few years of one-foot-in, one-foot-out, Foster says fluorescents are finally cementing themselves as a key 2022 FW trend—and, of course, that extends to your very good boys and girls. She’s spotted neon brights in everything from pet carriers to poo bags.

        Foster adds that dog and cat trends generally fall about three years behind human fashion trends and follow home interior and fashion design. But this year, highlighter hues were also super in vogue on 2022 runways with unabashedly bright items making a cameo in Valentino, Chanel, and Alexander McQueen fall/winter runway shows, among others. It’s a fabulous trend to embrace while on your way to the airport or hopping on the train with your pet.

        We Love… Ibiyaya’s showstopping stroller, which is available in several super-bright hues, including neon green and hot pink. The best part? It functions as a stroller, too, making the trek or commute an easier and smoother one.

        Fashion Tip 1: Be Strategic with Your Accessories

        Both Foster and Drouin agree that the essential component to coordinating with your pup or cat is to not make it too matchy-matchy but to pick out a corresponding color or texture. And this especially rings true when it comes to bold hues.

        Oversized but chic colorful glasses, Barbie-pink rings, and Crayola-colored earrings are just a few accessories that are all the rage this season that will pair nicely with your pet’s fun garb or carrier.

        Mix and Match and Layer Neutrals

        stylish pet carrier fashion

        Photo: Chewy

        Along with unisex and flourescent-accented pet carriers, slate gray continues to be particularly hot this season for home design and for pets—and Foster says there’s more pet carriers for travel choices than ever with options such as dog and cat backpacks, cool pet slings, and stylish totes.

        Coordinating with your pet’s gray goods is simple, too, because the color matches with almost anything. Get inventive and play around with 2022 fall and winter street style trends, like the Zoe Report-approved plaid-on-plaid trend, a breezy maxi dress, or layered neutral hues.

        It’s a look that’s great for everything from heading into the office with your pup in tow for a meeting-filled day, to dog-friendly happy hours and meeting up with coworkers for lunch.

        We Love… the K9 Rucksack Carrier by Kurgo, which comes in a fetching heather gray with brown faux leather and even features a space for your laptop. Or, opt for a purse, like Pet Gear’s carrier purse in Sand, that boasts some of our favorite on-trend neutral hues and matches with virtually any outfit.

        Make the Carrier the Statement Piece While On the Road

        stylish pet carrier fashion

        Photo: Chewy

        Taking your pup with you on a work trip? Airline-approved pet carriers for the plane have also exploded in variety, according to Foster—and there’s chic options aplenty.

        “I used to find just brown, green, black airline totes. Now, there’s more travel carrier colors, and you’ll see a mix and match of contrast of a colored handle with a different colored base bag, which is really fun,” Foster says.

        She points to the brand Roverlund, which she uses for her own dog travel carrier. The brand has its own camo and fluorescent-orange rope airline pet carrier. Another favorite is the statement-worthy red and grey carrier by Katziela dubbed the “Bone Cruiser.”

        Choices aren’t limited to totes, either. Many airline carrier bags now double as backpacks or come with wheels.

        We Love… In addition to the Roverlund bag, this collapsible bag by Petique comes in a classic black-and-gray combo or bold camo. Used as a piece of luggage, rolling carrier, pet car seat, a stroller or even a backpack, it’s perfect for a car or subway commute. We’re also big fans of Vanderpump Pets’ mesh carrier in blush. So chic.

        Fashion Tip 2: Pair the Statement Carrier with an All-Black ‘Fit

        When you’re using the dog or cat carrier as your statement piece, stay away from bold prints, and opt for classic pieces in your wardrobe. Opt for a matching set in black to make getting dressed in the morning easy-peasy.

        Choose Fashion and Function for Flights

        Always on the go with Mochi in tow, Because Mochi is so small, he usually opts for cat carrier—that way, the petite pup can curl up in the bag and snooze peacefully under the airline seat.

        When picking out your own airline carrier, Droun recommends something that looks like a stylish piece of luggage rather than a pet-specific item. Lots of pockets and a comfy strap are also essential.

        One other tip for traveling with your furry companion? Drouin warns a lot of pet travel regulations have changed post-2020.

        “Definitely check wherever you’re going both with airlines and destinations to make sure you’ve got whatever the latest is for traveling with your pet,” he says.

        We Love… This travel carrier by Petique in fluorescent blue because it has plenty of ventilation, can be worn like a crossbody bag, and comes with a washable mat for easy cleanup.

        When in Doubt, Choose Leather

        stylish pet carrier fashion

        Photo: Chewy
        We’ve talked at length about carriers, but what about your pet’s accessories, like leashes? “If you’re more dressed up for work, you’ll want to think about a leather leash, for example,” Foster says. Voluminous faux fur coats in neutral tones pair nicely with a chic leather leash. Faux fur, BTW, is also a burgeoning pet trend for winter, according to Foster.

        View this post on Instagram

        A post shared by PANTONE (@pantone)

        Or, you can choose to match the leather with some of this season’s hottest autumn colors, like dark navies, peachy nudes, oranges, browns—and Pantone’s color of the year, a purple shade the same hue as a jacaranda flower, dubbed Very Peri. We particularly love the idea of pairing a brightly hued monochrome outfit with a sleek leather leash for those mid-workday walks.

        We Love… Frisco’s leather leash, which is beautifully handcrafted with Latigo leather, a cowhide leather.

        A Poop Bag Dispenser Can Be Chic, Too

        stylish pet carrier fashion

        Photo: Chewy

        Yes, you heard that right: Poop bags are getting a major fashion upgrade.

        “You can also coordinate with a fun poo [bag holder] because poo bags are fashion accessories now,” Foster says. “There’s not just those plastic, ugly bone ones.” Think chic colors and eye-catching shapes, like mini purses.

        Sport your stylish poo bag with a cool, oversized vest or cardigan apropos for work. Or, for casual Friday, select straight-leg, light wash Levi’s jeans.

        We Love… This indigo mud cloth one by The Foggy Dog, a sleek blue or gray pet waste holder with a chic brass button by Eat Play Wag, and Scotch & Co’s Mini Barkin Poop Bag Dispenser (don’t you just love that name?).

        However you choose to coordinate with your pet, remember you don’t have to stray too far from your own personal style with this season’s wide swath of options. Let whatever pet carrier or travel accessory you choose amplify your fall look.

        The post Stylish Ways to Take Your Pet to Work This Fall appeared first on BeChewy.

        How to Measure Your Dog for Clothes (Because You Know You Want to Dress Up Your Pup)

        Oh, the joys of being a dog parent: happy greetings at the door, an endless supply of cuddles and kisses, that head tilt that sends you into cute overload—and don’t forget dressing your dog in adorable pup apparel! Whether you’re prepping your floof for a photo shoot, want to help them stay warm in the cold months, or simply want to keep them looking spiffy day-to-day, chances are you’ll want to buy them clothes at some point—and knowing how to measure a dog for apparel is step number one. Doing so ensures an excellent fit, which translates to fewer product returns, a comfortable pup, and a positively dapper appearance.

        For the full rundown on how to measure a dog for clothing, we sat down with three Chewy dog apparel experts: Chelsea Masselli, sourcing manager; Jannett Montoya, sourcing analyst; and Dani Huffaker, senior product development and sourcing specialist. They’ve each measured more than their share of pups to ensure Chewy dog models look pawsitively perfect in their photo shoots. Keep reading to learn more about which dog measurements you need to take and how to get the most accurate measurements.

        Supplies for Measuring Your Dog

        You only need a couple supplies for measuring your dog. Grab the following and you’ll be ready to go:

        Should My Dog Wear Clothes?

        Not every pup was born to be a fashionista—and many only learn to appreciate clothing after lots of gradual training.

        Never force your dog to wear clothes, and if your dog has never worn clothing before, start by letting them sniff and explore their garments before you put them on—with plenty of treats and praise along the way!

        Pro Tip: If you don’t have soft measuring tape handy, you can use ribbon or twine as an alternative. You’ll take the “measurement” using the string, then compare it against a ruler or rigid measuring tape to get the precise number.

        How to Measure a Dog’s Body: Step by Step

        There are three key areas to measure when fitting your dog for garments: their neck, their chest, and their body length. Here’s how to measure a dog for each.

        how to measure a dog

        1Measure Your Dog’s Neck

        To measure your dog’s neck for clothing—including dog coats, jackets, shirts, sweaters, and dresses—gently wrap your soft tape measure around the very base of the neck (right above where the neck meets their shoulders) to determine the circumference.

        Hold the tape measure close to their fur so that about two fingers can slip underneath. Anything tighter than that will be uncomfortable, but you also don’t want the garment to fit too loosely. Garments that are too loose aren’t comfortable or functional for your dog.

        how to measure a dog

        2Measure Your Dog’s Chest

        The chest girth measures the widest part of your dog’s body, including their rib cage. This girth measurement is arguably the most important when fitting your pup for garments. After all, if you can’t get the clothing past your dog’s chest then there’s zero chance of a good fit!

        Wrap the measuring tape behind your dog’s armpits underneath their body, then wrap it around the rib cage and over your dog’s shoulder blades. Remember to ensure the tape wraps around the widest part of their chest, and to leave enough room for two fingers to fit underneath comfortably.

        how to measure a dog

        3Measure Your Dog’s Length

        The final measurement you need when measuring a dog for clothing is their length. This one’s the most straightforward and probably the easiest.

        While your dog stands, stretch the tape measure in a straight line from the base of the tail (aka where the tail connects to their body) to the small indent between your dog’s shoulder blades where their neck and shoulders connect. That cute little notch is known as your dog’s withers, by the way.

        Withers

        Noun | WI-thurs

        Definition: The highest point of an animal’s back, typically characterized by a small indent between the shoulder blades in dogs.

        how to measure a dog

        4Order and Check the Fit

        Now that you’ve got your dog’s measurements, it’s time for the fun part: shopping! Many dog apparel brands and retailers offer a size chart similar to what you’d find for human clothing. Use the measurements you took—including body length, neck girth, and chest girth—and find the appropriate size.

        Pro Tip: If your dog is in-between sizes, always size up.

        Once you have the garment in hand, it’s time to try it on your dog. There are a few things to consider when making sure your dog’s clothes fit well. Signs of a good fit include:

        • The clothing isn’t too tight or too loose. If the clothing looks like it’s falling off or is supper baggy or loose, it’s not functional for your dog.
        • The neck meets the “two finger” rule. If you cannot fit two fingers underneath the neckline of the garment, it’s too tight.
        • The arm holes aren’t too tight: When applicable, use the “two finger” rule for the arm/leg holes, as well.
        • The back of the garment sits just above the tail. When checking the fit, the length should sit one to three inches above their tail. This is the most comfortable length for your dog (who’s free to wag their tail unencumbered) and also it just looks the sharpest! Some dresses, jackets, coats or costumes may extend lower, but this is the general rule.

        Shop Our Experts’ Favorite Dog Clothing

        What’s at the top of our Chewy experts’ dog apparel wish list? Check out these sweet and stylish picks.

        How to Measure a Dog for Accessories

        Some dog outfits just look better with an accessory or two! And in some cases, your dog might feel like wearing an accessory and nothing else at all. Here’s how to measure a dog for commonly worn dog accessories:

        Hats and Headbands

        Many dog hats and headbands feature stretchy material that allow for a “one size fits all” approach. Others may require you to measure your dog’s head circumference to determine the best size.

        To measure the head circumference, wrap a soft measuring tape underneath your dog’s chin and up and around their head (above their eyes and in front of their ears.)

        Bandanas and Bowties

        A dog bandana or bowtie sits loosely around the neck, so you’ll need to use their neck measurement to determine the best fit. Follow the instructions above, which include gently wrapping your soft tape measure around the base of the neck.

        Shoes and Boots

        Dog shoes and boots look adorable on your pup, but they often serve a utilitarian purpose, too This is particularly true in extreme climates, where shoes can help protect your dog’s feet from hot pavement or cold weather. They can also come in handy when hiking with your dog on rough terrain.

        To find your dog’s shoe size, you need to measure the length and width of their paws.

        • Length: Measure from the base of your dog’s heel pad to the tip of their longest toe, including the nail.
        • Width: Moving from left to right (or vice versa), measure from the furthest point of their heel pad to the other furthest point.

        Pro Tip: If your dog isn’t into the idea of having their paws measured, place your dog’s paw on a piece of paper and trace around it, then measure the paper. Also, always size up if your dog is in between sizes.

        Socks

        Dog socks can be worn on their own or paired with shoes or boots. Some are more robust compared to standard socks, which may allow you to forego the shoe altogether. Since dog socks are typically stretchy, you have a bit more leeway in terms of getting the best fit. To determine the appropriate size, use your dog’s paw-width measurement.


        How to Measure a Dog: FAQs

        Q:Where do you measure a dog’s height?

        A:A dog’s height isn’t considered an important measurement when determining the best clothing size. Even dogs of similar heights can have widely varying chest girth and length measurements and therefore wear different sizes. For example, Bulldogs and Dachshunds are somewhat similar in height, but the former dog breed has a much thicker neck and chest while Dachshunds are generally small dogs.

        The only exception would be if you’re measuring your dog for a front-walking costume. To measure your dog’s height, you’d measure from their withers (the notch between their shoulder blades, remember?) down their front legs and stop at the paw.


        Q:What is the difference between a dog’s height and length?

        A:Knowing how to measure dogs can get a bit confusing simply because they operate horizontally versus vertically like us humans! The height is the distance from their withers to their paw, while their length is the distance between their withers to the base of their tail. The former measures how far they are off the ground while the other measures how long their bodies are.


        Q:Can you use your dog’s weight to find their clothing size?

        A:While your dog’s weight might help inform the fit, it’s often not the best way to determine an accurate size. For example, some dog breeds may not weigh much but have a girthy neck or chest that requires a larger size than you’d expect. And some dogs may weigh more because of their height but have a smaller chest (like Greyhounds).

        Now that you’ve learned how to measure a dog, we anticipate many adorable dog outfits and photo-worthy costumes in your future!

        The post How to Measure Your Dog for Clothes (Because You Know You Want to Dress Up Your Pup) appeared first on BeChewy.

        Chef and Pet Parent Bobby Flay Has Definitely Turned Down Plans to Stay at Home With His Cats

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        The post Chef and Pet Parent Bobby Flay Has Definitely Turned Down Plans to Stay at Home With His Cats appeared first on BeChewy.

        Puppies & Picnic Blankets: How to Host the Ultimate Dog Picnic

        Puppies, picnic blankets, and pigs in a blanket: We’re talking about none other than everyone’s favorite summer activity, puppy picnics, which continue to be a popular activity among pet parents–and for good reason. Because who doesn’t love gathering the dogs (and their best friends) for an afternoon spent sprawling under summer’s warm rays, snacking on fresh fruits and veggies, and watching the pups at play?

        Wait, you’ve never hosted a dog picnic before? Well, my friend, you–and your pup–are in for a real treat because we spoke with puppy picnic experts who’ve generously dished on all the dos and don’ts, must-haves, and must-packs for hosting the ultimate puppy picnic that’ll have tails wagging and cameras snapping.

        What Are Puppy Picnics?

        The Picnic Style - Puppy Picnic

        Puppy picnics are just that: Picnics pet parents host for their four-legged friends.

        Here, dogs are treated to dog-friendly snacks, plenty of water, and an itinerary full of fun outdoor activities, from playing fetch to socializing with their invited doggy guests.

        And while dog picnics are popular now, their popularity spiked two years ago amid the global COVID-19 pandemic when social distancing and spending time outdoors were encouraged.

        “It was our little adopted Baxter that inspired the Picnic PupUp,” says Jam Stewart, founder of Picnic PopUp, which hosts what they call PupUp picnics for pets and their pet parents.

        “Our friends hadn’t met Baxter during lockdown, and we hosted a picnic to introduce him to everyone,” Stewart continues. “We had so much fun and thought that the PupUp would be a meaningful experience to add.”

        Since, Picnic PopUp’s PupUps (say that five times fast) continue to be a popular offering for the Nashville-based company.

        “Over the past two years, we’ve had consistent interest in the PupUp, which accounts for approximately 20 percent of all of our picnics booked. We also have puppy guests [who] regularly attend our other picnic events,” Stewart says, adding that the puppy picnics are most popular among their Gen Z customers.

        “Pets are an extension of themselves and go everywhere with them.”

        The Picnic Style, a Newport Beach-based luxury pop-up picnic experience company, also offers puppy picnics—and they’re what founder and CEO Julie Ann Nguyen describes as an “all-time favorite” among clients.

        “We usually host one to three per month,” Nguyen says of The Picnic Style’s Signature Puppy Soirée.

        Puppy Picnic Must-Haves

        Puppy picnic must-haves

        Photo: Magnify
        To host a puppy picnic, you’ll need more than just a picnic blanket, a basket, and your dog in tow.

        Pet parents seek out companies, like Picnic PopUp and The Picnic Style, for puppy picnics to celebrate all sorts of occasions, from birthdays and anniversaries to proposals and other key life moments. However, organizing your own dog picnic can be a breeze if you know what to bring.

        Here are the must-haves.

        1Food

        This includes your pooch’s usual, daily dog food (if they haven’t eaten yet), dog treats, and if you’re hosting a birthday picnic, a dog-friendly birthday cake. (We have just the recipe!)

        “My favorite dog treats would be from Farmland Traditions or Wagleaf Organics,” Nguyen says.

        For fresh foods that both pets and pet parents can enjoy, watermelon is a refreshing dog-friendly (and summer-appropriate) snack. Also, cucumber, bananas, and strawberries.

        Of course, you should always consult with your vet before serving any of these foods to determine the right portion size for your dog. Even a healthy treat should be factored into your dog’s optimum daily balanced diet.

        puppy picnic tip
        For pet parents who want to whip up a treat for their pup, here are four drool-worthy recipes that are puppy picnic-approved:

        2Picnic Basket

        In addition to packing the treats and other snacks in a picnic basket, be sure to bring servingware, too, like plates and cups and any utensils pet parents might need to eat their own food.

        3Water

        Water is essential! It’s important to keep all dogs in attendance well-hydrated and cool. Bring plenty of water with you; and if possible, choose a location that has a water fountain nearby (like a dog park) for easy refills. Oh, and don’t forget the water bowl.

        “Hydration is critical, especially in the summer,” Stewart says.

        puppy picnic tip

        4Toys

        Keep the dogs entertained with plenty of outdoorsy toys, like frisbees, tug toys, and tennis balls. Or, if your dog is more of a lounger (yeah, us, too), bring along their favorite chew toys to keep them active while they hang out with you on the blanket.

        “We like durable fun tug-style toys that are easy to play with while sitting down,” Stewart says.

        Chewy has plenty of toys:

        5Blanket

        What’s a picnic without a blanket to sit and lay on? Spring for an extra-large one, so you and pup have plenty of space. And make it a cozy one for extra pet (and pet parent) comfort.

        6Dog Bed or Mat

        In addition to the blanket, your pup may want to lay on a comfy travel bed. Or, on particularly hot days, bring along a cooling dog mat to help keep Fido cool.

        7Clean-Up Supplies

        This includes poop bags, garbage bags, and a towel–“in case of pet messes,” Stewart says.

        Make It a Party

        puppy picnic party

        Photo: Magnify
        For those pet parents who want to host a more elevated puppy picnic experience, here are the experts’ other must-brings.

        Props, Accessories, and Clothing

        “Pet parents love taking snaps with their pups,” Stewart says.

        Oh, yes, we do–and both Stewart and Nguyen recommend bringing along party hats, chic bandanas and bow ties, and more. Or, for fussy pups, dress your dog up for the occasion before you even step foot out of the house (they might be too distracted to let you dress them on-site!).

        “When it comes to your dog’s birthday, you’re going to want to celebrate it with all of their furry friends. Plus, the photos are to die for!” Nguyen says.

        Want a photo backdrop? Those are easy to DIY, too.

        Tablescape

        Have access to a table or plan to bring one? Great, then don’t forget the pet-themed table settings and pet-safe florals that’ll really take the picnic to another level.

        “We incorporate small items into the overall experience, including … décor items that celebrate pets,” Stewart says.

        How to Choose the Perfect Spot

        puppy picnic location

        To host a safe picnic, you have three key factors to consider.

        When choosing where to have your picnic, keep three things in mind:

        1. Is the location dog-friendly with plenty of space?
        2. Does the area have a water fountain?
        3. And, does it have a sufficient amount of shade nearby?

        “Shade is a must, along with adequate space,” Stewart says. “We like pet-friendly spaces that have pathways and are easy to access.”

        Puppy Picnic Dos and Don’ts

        puppy picnic dos and donts

        Now that you’re equipped with the safety tips and the packing list, here’s what you should do both before and during the picnic.

        Do: Walk the dog before the picnic.

        Walking the dog before the picnic helps get rid of excess energy, in turn leading to a more enjoyable picnic experience where pet parents and pets alike can relax (even if just for a few moments) and actually enjoy their meal or treats, respectively.

        Do: Check for discarded bones and trash at your picnic area.

        As soon as you reach the picnic site, do a quick sweep of the area in search of tossed chicken bones, ribs, or rancid meat that could make your dog ill.

        Do: Safely leash your dog.

        It’s likely you’ll be picnicking in an area that requires your pooch be on a leash at all times. And an easy way to follow the rules while also giving your dog more wiggle room to play is by using a tie-out cable and stake, some of which extend as far as 30 feet.

        Or, bring an extra leash and loop it around the leg of a sturdy picnic table or tree. This helps keep your dog both secure and close to the action. Waist leashes are another option if you plan to stay put on the picnic blanket and want to keep the pup close by.

        Don’t: Leave your dog unattended.

        It’s an obvious one, but keep an eye on your dogs at all times and do not leave them unattended.

        Don’t: Feed your dog harmful, toxic people food.

        Dogs can’t eat everything their pet parents eat. That’s why it’s important to bring dog-safe treats and snacks, in addition to your own picnic foods.

        Some common summer foods that dogs can’t eat include hot dogs, grapes and raisins, chips and pretzels, salsa and guac, and more. See a full list here.

        There you have it: the ultimate puppy picnic how-to. So, what are you waiting for? Drop those puppy picnic invitations in the mailbox and start gathering all the essentials. Your pup (and all their friends) will thank you for it with plenty of slobbery kisses.

        Before you go, though, don’t forget to save, bookmark, or pin this handy infographic for your next puppy picnic!

        Image

        The post Puppies & Picnic Blankets: How to Host the Ultimate Dog Picnic appeared first on BeChewy.

        What Can I Give My Cat for Allergies?

        Itchy skin, hair loss, skin and ear infections: Allergies in cats can manifest in many ways—none of which are particularly comfortable for your furry friend. Luckily, though, there are several options for allergy relief in cats, including treatments from your veterinarian, easy home remedies for cat allergies, and over-the-counter options that only require a visit to your local drug store.

        It is always advised to talk to your veterinarian and get a diagnosis of allergies before treating an allergic cat. This is because many other skin conditions such as bacterial skin infections or mites have similar signs to skin allergies but require different treatments. Always work with your veterinarian if you have a cat with allergy symptoms to get to the bottom of the problem and solve it, if possible.

        Diagnosing Cat Allergies

        While the true prevalence of allergies in cats is unknown, it’s believed to affect anywhere from 10 to 15 percent of cats. And one of the most common cat allergies? Flea allergy dermatitis, which is among one of three main skin allergies in cats:

        1Flea Allergy Dermatitis

        Flea allergy dermatitis (FAD) is caused by an allergic reaction to flea saliva.

        The classic signs of FAD in cats include:

        • Itching
        • scratching around the head and neck
        • miliary dermatitis along the back
        • hair loss
        • scabs around the base of the tail or around the head and neck

        You may or may not see fleas.

        FAD can be so intense that it takes just the bite of one passing flea to make a cat miserable and pull their hair out!

        2Environmental Allergies

        Environmental allergies such as seasonal allergies to pollens, animal dander, or mold mites are called atopy.

        Signs of atopy include:

        • Itchiness around head and neck—but cats may be itchy elsewhere. Itching may or may not be seasonal, depending on the allergen.
        • Recurrent ear infections and miliary dermatitis
        • Secondary skin infections with yeast and bacteria
        • Eosinophilic granuloma complex lesions

        Usually first seen in cats ages 6 months to 2 years of age, atopy may be linked to asthma or chronic bronchitis in some allergic cats.

        3Food Allergies

        More accurately known as adverse food reactions, this is when a cat reacts to an ingredient in the food, usually a source of protein. Affected cats are usually fed the offending ingredient for two years before developing signs. The most common allergens in cats are protein in nature and include chicken, beef, pork, egg, soy, and dairy.

        The second most-common itchy skin disease in cats, with Siamese cats predisposed to this condition, food allergies usually have both skin and GI signs and are year-round or occur after eating an offending food.

        Cats who have a food allergy often have concurrent flea allergy dermatitis and/or atopy as well.

        Signs of food allergies in cats include:

        • Non-seasonal itching and scratching the head, neck, or in some cats, elsewhere on the body
        • Hair loss
        • Red skin
        • Miliary dermatitis
        • Eosinophilic granuloma complex
        • Scabs
        • GI signs such as vomiting, diarrhea, and gas

        In general, cat allergy symptoms include:

        • Excessive itchiness as evidenced by increased self-scratching, chewing, licking and/or rubbing skin on carpet or furniture especially around the head and neck
        • Miliary dermatitis crusty bumps all over the body
        • Red skin or rashes
        • Hair loss
        • Swelling of face, lips, eyelids, or ears
        • Red bumps or pimples on skin (skin infection)
        • Increased skin odor
        • Increased head shaking, scratching ears, and ears that are red, smelly, and have increased ear wax (ear infection)
        • Hives
        • Excessive dandruff
        • Eosinophilic granuloma complex or plaque
        • Vomiting, diarrhea, excess gas (food allergy)
        cat allergies symptoms infographic bechewy

        Photo: Chewy Studios

        Treating Cat Allergies

        If you’ve noticed any of these signs of allergies in your cat, there are a few ways to go about treating the symptoms, including with OTC options, DIY remedies, and prescription medicine. We’ll group treatments by type of allergies, starting with environmental/seasonal allergies (atopy).
        seasonal dog allergies
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        Treating Seasonal Allergies in Cats

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        Photo: Chewy Studios, sony_moon/iStock

        OTC Medications

        If your cat has been diagnosed with seasonal allergies, there are several over-the-counter cat allergy medicine options and supplements options you can try. It is always a good idea to check in with your vet before treating your cat for allergies.

        • Oral antihistamines
        • Topically applied wipes and shampoos
        • Omega-3 fatty acids
        • Probiotics

        Antihistamines

        Cats with mild, seasonal allergic reactions respond well to human over-the-counter allergy medicine that you can purchase at most drug stores. The most common antihistamine for cats is diphenhydramine, brand name Benadryl. Diphenhydramine is safe in most cats if given in the recommended dosage of 1 mg of diphenhydramine per pound of body weight, given once daily by mouth. Giving cats Benadryl may make some cats sleepy, and other cats hyper, and is not safe for all cats, so talk with your veterinarian before giving it to your cat.

        If Benadryl doesn’t work for your allergic cat, there are other OTC antihistamines for cats available, including chlorpheniramine and clemastine. Talk with your veterinarian about which option is best for your cat, and the correct dosage to administer. Antihistamines work best if given before itching starts.

        Anti-allergy Wipes and Shampoos

        Giving oral antihistamines to a cat with allergy symptoms in conjunction with wiping or washing allergens off your cat is recommended to reduce exposure to allergens.

        You can either wipe your cat with a pet wipe, like TropiClean Oxy Med Allergy Relief Wipes after they go outside and roll in the grass, or you can bathe your cat periodically with a hypoallergenic shampoo, like DermAllay Oatmeal Shampoo. You could also try using a shampoo designed to reduce itching such as Davis Pramoxine Anti-itch Shampoo. Veterinary shampoos and conditioners, like Virbac Epi-Soothe Shampoo and Cream Rinse, are also formulated to quickly reduce itching and dryness.

        When bathing a cat for allergies, it is important to leave the lather on your cat for five to 10 minutes before rinsing and to thoroughly rinse the shampoo with room temperature water. Do not use hot water because it can dry their skin and make the itching worse. Aim for bathing itchy cats once a week to control itching, or as directed by your veterinarian.

        DIY Remedies

        In addition to the OTC remedies listed above, here are some additional supplements you can try at home to control seasonal allergies in cats.

        Omega-3 Fatty Acids

        Some cats with seasonal allergies respond well to fish oil supplementation. Studies have shown that fish oil supplements, like 21st Century Essential Pet Alaska Wild Salmon Oil Chews, help reduce inflammation associated with skin allergies and help skin cells maintain a strong barrier against allergens. You can give a cat too much fish oil, however, and fish oil is not indicated for all cats, so consult with your veterinarian on the appropriate dosage before giving fish oil to your cat.

        The omega-3 fatty acids that help cats with allergies are EPA and DHA. While cats can convert GLA and ALA (the fatty acids found in evening primrose oil and flaxseed), they do so poorly and benefit the most from fatty acid supplementation from fish or krill oil.

        Also, many OTC fish oil products do not have high enough concentration of omega-3 fatty acids to help with allergies. Ask your vet for a specific dosage for your cat, and if they have a product they recommend.

        Probiotics

        Some cats with seasonal allergies benefit from taking a probiotic. Allergies are due to inflammation and an abnormally hyper-reactive immune system. The largest immune system in the body is called the GALT, and it is in the gut. Unhealthy or inflamed intestines with abnormal gut bacteria can contribute to allergies, which is why supplementing an allergic cat with probiotics may help reduce inflammation in the body and rebalance their gut immune system.

        Do not supplement cats with human probiotics, as human gut bacteria is different from feline. Use a feline-specific product, like Purina Pro Plan FortiFlora Feline Probiotic Supplement.

        Prescription Medicine

        Sometimes, home remedies for cat allergies are not enough, and cat owners need prescription medication from the veterinarian to stop the itch.

        While there is no one best allergy medicine for cats (because every cat is unique), the right therapy in combination with home remedies for cat allergies will provide relief for your cat.

        Always make sure you tell the vet what OTC and holistic remedies you are currently giving your cat, as they can potentially interact with prescription meds.

        • Prescription topical treatments
        • Prescription oral treatments
        • Allergy shots

        Prescription Topical Treatments

        For itchy, infected skin, Animax Ointment—a prescription topical treatment that combines a corticosteroid, an antifungal and an antibiotic—may help. Other topical steroid sprays or lotions may also be prescribed.

        Prescription Oral Treatments

        If OTC oral antihistamines, fish oils, and topical products aren’t cutting it, then it’s time to explore prescription cat allergy treatment options for your itchy cat.

        In the old days, the only cat allergy medicine options available were steroids, like prednisone, prednisolone, and triamcinolone. While these medications did stop allergy symptoms, they also came with a whole host of negative side effects, including increased appetite, increased water consumption and urination, and increased susceptibility to infections, to name a few. Steroids are also less effective with food allergies.

        Oral and injectable steroids are still used and prescribed in cat allergy cases, but there are other allergy meds for cats available that stop itching without the negative side effects associated with steroids.

        Atopica

        Atopica is the brand name for cyclosporine, a medicine for cats with allergies.

        • Atopica is generally considered safe but can cause vomiting, diarrhea, or loss of appetite in some cats. You can lower the chance of negative side effects by keeping Atopica in the freezer.
        • Atopica must be given one to two hours before food or two hours after food.
        • Most veterinarians will require annual bloodwork and an exam to fill this prescription.
        • Atopica takes four to six weeks to provide relief, and other medications may be prescribed to your cat in the interim to control allergy symptoms.

        Apoquel

        Apoquel is the brand name of oclacitinib and works by targeting and inhibiting the itch and inflammation signaling pathway. It is effective in reducing itching associated with flea allergy and atopy in cats and can be given long-term with a low incidence of side effects.

        • Apoquel should not be given to cats with parasitic skin infestations or cancer and may cause bone marrow suppression (rare).
        • While Apoquel can be used in cats with allergies, this use is not FDA-approved.
        • Cats require higher doses of Apoquel as compared to dogs; and while some cats respond well to Apoquel, it doesn’t help all cats.
        • Annual bloodwork will likely be required for cats that are on Apoquel long-term.
        • All prescription medications can have unwanted side effects or safety issues and should only be used under the supervision of a veterinarian.

          Allergy Shots

          If your cat cannot tolerate oral medications or you do not want to give oral medications over a long period of time, you may want to talk to your veterinarian about giving allergy injections, commonly known as allergy shots for cats or immunotherapy.

          Allergy shots require owners to take their fur babies either to the local veterinarian or a veterinary dermatologist for allergy testing. Allergies are tested with a blood test or with a skin prick test. The skin prick test is considered more accurate and usually only done by veterinary dermatologists.

          Once the test is done, an allergy serum is created. This allergy serum is administered via a series of injections and is intended to desensitize your cat over time to the allergens that cause them grief. Improvement in symptoms can take six months to one year, and other therapies are used to control symptoms in the meantime. Allergy shots are the only way to truly reduce the instances of allergy symptoms. All other cat allergy medicine is aimed at controlling symptoms.

          Treating Flea Allergy Dermatitis in Cats

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          Photo: Chewy Studios, chendongshan/iStock

          OTC Medications

          For cats with FAD, over-the-counter medications include the following:

          • Topically applied wipes and shampoos
          • Omega-3 fatty acids, which can help with promoting skin health but not with treating FAD

            Prescription Medications

            As for prescription medications, they include:

            • Apoquel
            • Prednisone
            • Prednisolone
            • Triamcinolone
            • Betamethasone

            Treating Cat Food Allergies

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            Photo: Chewy Studios, krblokhin/iStock
            If your cat has year-round skin problems or has itchy skin that flares after eating certain foods, your cat may have a food allergy and may benefit from a veterinarian-supervised food elimination trial with a cat food specifically formulated for cats with ingredient allergies. Here’s how it works.

            Food Elimination Trial

            Food allergies can only be diagnosed by a food elimination trial.

            The basic gist of a food trial is this:

            1. You work with your veterinarian to choose a prescription hypoallergenic diet for your cat (more on that below).
            2. Then, after you slowly transition your cat to the new food over three to five days, you will feed only that food to your cat for eight to 10 weeks. That means that nothing else other than the hypoallergenic food will go in your cat’s mouth—no other treats, table food, flavored medications, or chews, etc. Your cat must consume only that food.

            The reason you must only feed the hypoallergenic diet for eight to 10 weeks is to diagnose a food allergy. Since it takes about 20 days for feline epidermis (skin) to turn over and at least six weeks for previous allergens to clear out, diet trials must last eight to 10 weeks.

            If all the itching goes away on the new diet, then it is likely that your cat has a food allergy. If that is the case, then you have two options:

            1. Either stay on the hypoallergenic diet, or
            2. slowly start to reintroduce foods into your cat’s diet and see if the symptoms return.

            Most pet parents understandably don’t want the itching to return, so they elect to keep feeding their cat the hypoallergenic diet.

            Hypoallergenic Foods

            If your veterinarian has recommended a diet trial, it is important to follow their food recommendations precisely. Over-the-counter foods are not considered good hypoallergenic choices for food trials because they are often manufactured on machines that make other foods. Hypoallergenic foods generally are created on dedicated machines that are meticulously cleaned to prevent cross-contamination with allergens (this is also why these diets cost more).

            There are two main types of food to choose for diet trials: hydrolyzed foods, which are foods that are manufactured to remove allergens, or novel protein foods, where you feed your cat a protein and carbohydrate that he has never eaten before.

            Popular cat food for cats with allergies that are used by veterinarians for diet trials could include:

            Treating the Environment for Cat Allergies

            cat allergies environment treatment inline

            Photo: Chewy Studios, Phynart Studio/iStock

            If you have a cat with allergies, then you also need to think about treating the environment your cat lives in, especially if your cat suffers from flea allergies or atopy. This includes:

            • Flea control
            • Reduce exposure to allergens
            • Combination of therapies

            Flea Control

            If your cat has a flea allergy, then the bite of just one flea can drive her crazy. Use flea control religiously on all dogs and cats in the household consistently throughout flea season to keep flea allergies under control. (Be sure you use a flea and tick treatment formulated specifically for each type of pet. In other words, don’t give your cat a flea and tick treatment formulated for dogs, and vice versa.)

            Reduce Exposure to Allergens

            If your cat has atopy, then you need to reduce exposure to allergens. Use a HEPA filter in your furnace, plug in some air purifiers, cover bedding with an allergen barrier, and wash pet bedding once a week during allergy season with a gentle, hypoallergenic laundry detergent.

            Combination of Therapies

            So, what can you give your cat for allergies? Every cat is unique and causes and severity can vary so the answer might be more complicated than you may have thought. Controlling allergies takes some trial and error, and usually requires a combination of therapies. Working with your veterinarian, you can discover what to give your cat for allergies—and stop the itching for good.


            Cat Allergies FAQs

            Image

            Photo: Chewy Studios, Chalabala/iStock

            Q: What causes cat allergies?

            A: In cats, allergies can be caused by pollen, dust, dust mites, mold, dander, and other allergens—just like in humans. Cats can also be allergic to flea saliva when they are bitten by fleas, or develop allergies to ingredients in their food, resulting in itchy skin and digestion abnormalities. 

            Q: Is there an allergy pill for cats?

            A: There are several oral medications that have been used for allergies in cats, including diphenhydramine, hydroxyzine, chlorpheniramine, clemastine, cyclosporine, and oclacitinib. Talk with your veterinarian about which option is best for your cat and the correct dosage to administer.

            Q: What are the side effects of cat allergy medication?

            A: Side effects of antihistamines include excessive tiredness, hyperactivity, and vomiting, diarrhea, seizures in sensitive animals. Side effects of cyclosporine include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and gingival hyperplasia. Side effects of oclacitinib include behavioral changes and bone marrow suppression. Oclacitinib should not be given to cats with external parasites or cancer.

            Q: How do I get rid of allergens in a cat’s litter box?

            A: The best way to get rid of allergens in a cat’s litter box is to use a low dust litter. Avoid litters that contain granulated (bentonite) clay. Choose low-dust biodegradable litter or silica litter.

             Scoop the litter once or twice daily and change the litter every two to three days. When you change the litter, clean the box with warm, soapy water, rinse well, and let air dry. It is best to have two boxes in rotation. Place the litterbox in a well-ventilated area away from the central air intake vent or furnace (both create dust), and avoid using a hood or covered box.

            Q: What is the best antihistamine for cats?

            A: Diphenhydramine, hydroxyzine, chlorpheniramine, and clemastine have all been used safely in cats. Talk with your veterinarian about which option is best for your cat and the correct dosage to administer. Antihistamines work best if given before itching starts.

            Q: What kind of Benadryl is safe for cats? How much Benadryl can I give my cat?

            A: Most cats can tolerate diphenhydramine, which is the active ingredient in Benadryl. The standard dosage is 1 mg per pound of body weight, given once daily. Not all cats can tolerate Benadryl, however, and Benadryl may interact with other medications. Always check with your vet before giving your cat Benadryl.


            There are no “stupid” questions when it comes to your pet’s health. If you suspect your pet is sick, please call your vet immediately. For health-related questions, always consult your regular veterinarian when possible as they can make the best recommendations for your pet.

            Have more questions about your pet’s behavior? Get expert advice through Chewy’s Connect With a Vet service, available daily from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. ET.

            The post What Can I Give My Cat for Allergies? appeared first on BeChewy.

            What Can I Give My Dog for Allergies?

            Have you seen your pup scratching more? How about hair loss? Hives? What you might be seeing your poor pup suffer through are allergies, which are fairly common in dogs and can manifest in many ways, from skin and ear infections to itchy and red skin.

            Fortunately, there are many options for allergy relief in dogs, including treatments from your veterinarian, easy home remedies for dog allergies and over-the-counter (OTC) options that only require a visit to your local drug store. And we’ll discuss it all.

            Of course, it is always advised to talk to your veterinarian before starting any treatment for allergies and to work with your veterinarian to determine and eliminate the root cause of allergies in your dog, if possible.

            Diagnosing Dog Allergies

            Veterinarians group skin allergies in dogs into three main categories:

            1Flea allergy dermatitis

            This is caused by an allergy to flea saliva and is the most common type of allergic reactions in dogs.

            • The classic sign of flea allergy dermatitis (FAD) in dogs is hot spots, either around the base of the tail or around the neck.
            • Dogs who are allergic to fleas are so itchy that they attack their own skin, pull out hair, and make raw, reddened “hot spots.”

            Flea allergy dermatitis can be so intense that it takes just the bite of one passing flea to make a dog miserable.

            2Environmental allergies, such as seasonal allergies

            This is called atopy, and about 15 percent of the U.S. dog population suffer from seasonal allergies.

            • Dogs with atopy are seasonally itchy around their face, paws, and armpits.
            • Recurrent ear infections are common with atopy.

            Atopy is usually first seen in dogs ages 1 to 3 years of age. Secondary skin infections with yeast and bacteria are common.

            3Food allergy

            This is when a dog reacts to an ingredient in the food, usually a source of protein. While less common than other issues, about 10 percent of dogs can suffer from food allergies. Dogs who have a food allergy often have concurrent flea allergy dermatitis and/or atopy as well.

            • Dogs with a food allergy are itchy around their rump, armpits, groin, face and in between their toes.
            • The most common allergens in dogs are protein in nature and include chicken, beef, pork, egg, soy, and dairy.

            Food allergies tend to be non-seasonal (year-round), and affected dogs are usually fed the offending ingredient for two years before developing signs.

            In general, the following symptoms are associated with allergies in dogs:

            • Excessive itchiness as evidenced by increased self-scratching, chewing, licking and/or rubbing skin on carpet or furniture
            • Red skin
            • Hair loss
            • Swelling of face, lips, eyelids, or ears
            • Red bumps or pimples on skin (skin infection)
            • Increased skin odor
            • Thickened skin that is darkened (chronic yeast infection)
            • Red paws that may be stained brown from excessive licking
            • Increased odor, discharge and itching from ears (ear infection)
            • Itchy, runny eyes
            • Hives
            • Excessive dandruff
            • Vomiting, diarrhea, excess gas (typically seen with food allergy)
            • Sneezing or coughing

            dog allergies symptoms infographic bechewy

            Photo: Chewy Studios

            Treating Dog Allergies

            If you’ve noticed any of these signs of allergies in your dog, there are a few ways to go about treating the symptoms, including with OTC options, DIY remedies, and prescription medicine. We’ll group treatments by type of allergies, starting with seasonal allergies (atopy or atopic dermatitis).
            seasonal dog allergies
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            Remember: It’s always a good idea to check in with your vet before treating your dog for allergies.

            Have more questions about your pet’s behavior? Get expert advice through Chewy’s Connect With a Vet service, available daily from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. ET.

            Treating Seasonal Allergies

            seasonal dog allergies inline

            Photo: Chewy Studios, ulkas/iStock

            OTC Medications

            If your dog has a skin infection, external parasites, or food allergies, using an over-the-counter product may not help and may make it worse. If your dog is not responding, consult with your veterinarian.

            Antihistamines

            Many dogs respond well to human OTC allergy medicine that you can purchase at most drug stores. The most common antihistamine for dogs is diphenhydramine (brand name Benadryl). Also found in ProSense Dog Itch & Allergy Solutions Tablets, diphenhydramine is safe in most dogs if given in the recommended dosage of 1 mg of diphenhydramine per pound of body weight given by mouth. For example, if you have a 25-pound dog, then you would give 25 mg of diphenhydramine.

            Giving dogs Benadryl may make some dogs sleepy, and other dogs hyper, and is not safe for all dogs. So, talk with your veterinarian before giving it to your dog.

            If Benadryl doesn’t work for your dog, there are other OTC antihistamines available, including hydroxyzine, loratadine (brand name Claritin), chlorpheniramine, clemastine, fexofenadine, and cetirizine (Zyrtec). Talk with your veterinarian about which option is best for your dog, and the correct dosage to administer.

            Anti-allergy Wipes and Shampoos

            If your dog has seasonal allergies, then giving oral antihistamines in conjunction with wiping or washing allergens off your dog is very helpful in preventing itching. You can either wipe your dog with a pet wipe, like TropiClean Oxy Med Allergy Relief Wipes after they go outside and roll in the grass, or you can bathe your dog periodically with a hypoallergenic shampoo, like Vet’s Best Hypo-Allergenic Shampoo for Dogs or Perfect Coat Gentle Hypoallergenic Shampoo.

            You could also try using a shampoo designed to reduce itching, such as Nootie Medicated Anti-Itch Dog Shampoo. Veterinary shampoos and conditioners, like Virbac Epi-Soothe Shampoo and Cream Rinse, are also formulated to quickly reduce itching and dryness.

            When bathing a dog for allergies, it is important to leave the lather on your dog for five to 10 minutes before rinsing and to thoroughly rinse the shampoo with cool water. Do not use hot water because it can dry their skin and make the itching worse. Aim for bathing itchy dogs no more than one to two times per week to control itching.

            DIY Remedies

            Omega-3 Fatty Acids

            Some dogs with seasonal allergies respond well to fish oil supplementation.   that fish oil supplements, like Nordic Naturals Omega-3 Pet Soft Gels, help reduce inflammation associated with skin allergies and help skin cells maintain a strong barrier against allergens. You can give a dog too much fish oil, however, and fish oil is not indicated for all dogs. So, consult with your veterinarian on the appropriate dosage before giving fish oil to your dog.

            The omega-3 fatty acids that help dogs with allergies are EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid). While dogs can convert GLA (gamma-linolenic acid) and ALA (gamma-linolenic acid and alpha-linolenic acid, respectively—the fatty acids found in evening primrose oil and flaxseed), they do so poorly, and benefit the most from fatty acid supplementation from fish or krill oil. Also, many OTC fish oil products do not have high enough concentration of omega-3 fatty acids to help with allergies. Ask your vet for a specific dosage for your dog.

            Probiotics

            Some dogs with seasonal allergies benefit from taking a probiotic.

            Allergies are due to inflammation and an abnormally hyper reactive immune system. The largest immune system in the body is called the GALT, and it is in the gut. Unhealthy or inflamed intestines with abnormal gut bacteria can contribute to allergies, which is why supplementing an allergic dog with probiotics may help reduce inflammation in the body and rebalance their gut immune system.

            Do not supplement dogs with human probiotics as human gut bacteria is different from canine. Use a canine-specific product, like Purina Pro Plan Veterinary Diets FortiFlora Powder Digestive Supplement for Dogs.

            Quercetin

            Quercetin may benefit dogs with allergies in much the same way that antihistamines do. Quercetin reduces inflammation and histamine release associated with seasonal allergies in dogs, and it works synergistically with bromelain to create a more potent anti-inflammatory effect. So, look for a supplement that contains both.

            The dosage is 5 to 10 mg per pound of body weight twice daily. For example, a 20-pound dog would take 100 to 200 mg twice daily.

            You can purchase quercetin anywhere supplements are sold. Just make sure it doesn’t contain other ingredients, like xylitol, which is toxic to dogs. When in doubt, ask your veterinary care team for safe supplement recommendations.

            Prescription Medicine

            Sometimes, home remedies for dog allergies are not enough, and you need something from your veterinarian that is prescription-strength to stop the itch. Fortunately, there are many products available that can be used alone or in combination with home remedies for dog allergies to provide the right amount of relief for your dog, including:

            • Prescription topical treatments
            • Prescription oral treatments
            • Allergy shots

            Always make sure you tell the vet what OTC and holistic remedies you are currently giving your dog, as they can potentially interact with prescription meds.

            Topical Treatments

            If your dog has an itchy, red hot spot, Animax Ointment (a prescription topical treatment that combines a corticosteroid, an antifungal and an antibiotic) may help. Topical sprays containing a steroids, like Genesis Spray by Virbac, are often prescribed for local itchy hot spots as well.

            Oral Treatments

            If OTC oral antihistamines, fish oils, and topical products aren’t cutting it, then it’s time to explore prescription dog allergy treatment options for your itchy dog.

            In the old days, the only oral prescription options available were steroids, like prednisone, prednisolone, triamcinolone, and betamethasone. While these medications did stop allergy symptoms, they also came with a whole host of negative side effects, including increased appetite, increased water consumption and urination, and increased susceptibility to infections, to name a few. Steroids are also less effective with food allergies.

            Oral and injectable steroids are still used and prescribed in some dog allergy cases, but there are new medications available that still stop itching without the negative side effects.

            Atopica

            Atopica is the brand name for cyclosporine, a medicine for dogs with allergies.

            • It’s generally considered safe but can cause vomiting, diarrhea, or loss of appetite in some dogs. You can lower the chance of negative side effects by keeping Atopica in the freezer.
            • Atopica must be given one to two hours before food or two hours after food.
            • Most veterinarians will require annual bloodwork and an exam to fill this prescription.
            • Atopica takes four to six weeks to provide relief, and steroids may be prescribed to your dog in the interim to control allergy symptoms.

            Apoquel

            Apoquel is another newer prescription allergy relief for dogs that is touted to have even fewer side effects than Atopica.

            • Apoquel takes effect within four hours and can be started or stopped at any time to control itching.
            • It works by targeting and inhibiting the itch and inflammation signaling pathway.
            • It’s administered twice daily for up to 14 days and can be given long-term with a low incidence of side effects.
            • Apoquel should not be given to dogs with existing parasitic skin infestations or pre-existing cancers.

            Temaril-P

            Your veterinarian may also recommend treatment with Temaril-P, an oral prescription allergy medication that combines the antihistamine trimeprazine with the steroid prednisolone.

            • This medication can be given to control seasonal or flea allergies.
            • As prescription-strength products can have unwanted side effects and possible safety concerns for people, they should only be used under the supervision of a veterinarian.

            Allergy Shots

            If your dog cannot tolerate oral medications or you do not want to give oral medications over a long period of time, you may want to talk to your veterinarian about giving allergy injections, commonly known as allergy shots.

            There are two main allergy shots available:

            1. Traditional allergy shots created by a skin or blood test
            2. General prescription option, Cytopoint

            Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) and stem cell therapy is less common but something to potentially discuss with your vet.

            Traditional Allergy Shot

            The traditional allergy shot requires that you take your dog either to your local veterinarian or a veterinary dermatologist for allergy testing. Allergies are tested with a blood test or with a skin prick test. The skin prick test is considered more accurate and is usually only done by veterinary dermatologists.

            Once the test is done, an allergy serum is created. This allergy serum is administered via a series of injections and is intended to desensitize your dog over time to the allergens that cause them grief. Allergy shots are the only way to truly reduce the instances of allergy symptoms. All other treatments are aimed at controlling symptoms.

            Cytopoint

            Cytopoint is another option that is administered as an injection. It starts providing relief within one day and controls allergic itching for four to eight weeks. It works by targeting and neutralizing interleukin 31 (IL-31), a chemical messenger in your dog’s body that makes him itchy.

            Cytopoint is only available through your local veterinarian and has a low incidence of side effects. It may be a good option if your dog cannot tolerate oral medications, isn’t responding to oral medications, or has concurrent diseases that prohibit the administration of other allergy medications.

            Platelet Rich Plasma and Stem Cell Therapy

            Platelet Rich Plasma and stem cell therapy, both of which have been used to treat joint disease for quite some time in dogs, have also been shown to have a positive effect in dogs who are suffering from seasonal allergies. Talk to your vet about these cutting-edge therapies.

            Treating Flea Allergy Dermatitis

            flea dog allergies inline

            Photo: Chewy Studios, blackdovfx/iStock

            OTC Medications

            For dogs with flea allergy dermatitis, over-the-counter medications include the following:

            • Topically applied wipes and shampoos
            • Omega-3 fatty acids, which can help with promoting skin health but not with treating flea allergy dermatitis

              Prescription Medications

              As for prescription medications, they include:

              • Apoquel
              • Prednisone
              • Prednisolone
              • Triamcinolone
              • Betamethasone
              • Animax
              • Genesis Spray

              Treating Dog Food Allergies

              food dog allergies inline

              Photo: Chewy Studios, chris-mueller/iStock

              Even though food allergies are less common in dogs than atopy or flea allergy, they can still occur.

              If your dog has allergies year-round or has itchy skin that flares after eating certain foods, your dog may have a food allergy and may need a dog food specifically formulated for dogs with allergies. Check with your vet for suggested options.

              Here are the basics for treating dog food allergies:

              • Food elimination trial
              • Hypoallergenic diet
              • Hydrolyzed diet
              • Novel protein diet

              Food Elimination Trial

              Food allergies can only be diagnosed by a food elimination trial.

              The basic gist of a food trial is this: You work with your veterinarian to choose a prescription hypoallergenic diet for your dog (more on that below), and then after you slowly transition your dog to the new food over three to five days, you will feed only that food for eight to 10 weeks. That means that nothing else other than the hypoallergenic food will go in your dog’s mouth—no other treats, table food, flavored medications, or chews, etc. Your dog must consume only that food.

              Hypoallergenic Diet

              The reason you must only feed the hypoallergenic diet for eight to 10 weeks is to diagnose a food allergy. Since it takes about 20 days for canine epidermis (skin) to turn over and at least six weeks for previous allergens to clear out, diet trials must last eight to 10 weeks.

              If all the itching goes away on the new diet, then it is likely that your dog has a food allergy. If that is the case, then you have two options: Either stay on the hypoallergenic diet, or slowly start to reintroduce foods into your dog’s diet and see if the symptoms return.

              Most pet parents understandably don’t want the itching to return, so they elect to keep feeding their dog the hypoallergenic diet.
              If your veterinarian has recommended a diet trial, it is important to follow their food recommendations precisely. Over-the-counter diets are not considered good hypoallergenic choices for food trials because they are often manufactured on machines that make other diets. Hypoallergenic diets generally are created on dedicated machine that are meticulously cleaned to prevent cross-contamination with allergens.

              Hydrolyzed Diets vs. Novel Protein Diets

              There are two main types of food to choose for diet trials: hydrolyzed diets, which are foods that are manufactured to remove allergens, or novel protein diets, where you feed your dog a protein and carbohydrate that he has never eaten before.
              Popular dog food for dogs with allergies that are used by veterinarians for diet trials could include:

              Treating the Environment

              treat environment dog allergies inline

              Photo: Chewy Studios, ArtistGNDphotography/iStock

              If you have a dog with allergies, then you also need to think about treating the environment your dog lives in, especially if your dog suffers from flea allergies or atopy. They include:

              • Flea control
              • Reduce expose to allergens
              • Combination of therapies

              Flea Control

              If your dog has a flea allergy, then the bite of just one flea can drive him crazy. Use flea control on all dogs and cats in the household consistently throughout flea season to keep flea allergies under control. (Be sure you use a flea and tick treatment formulated specifically for each type of pet. In other words, don’t give your cat a flea and tick treatment formulated for dogs, and vice versa.)

              Reduce Exposure to Allergens

              If your dog is prone to seasonal allergies, then you need to reduce exposure to allergens. Use a HEPA filter in your furnace, plug in some air purifiers, cover bedding with an allergen barrier, and wash pet bedding once a week during allergy season with a gentle, hypoallergenic laundry detergent.

              Combination of Therapies

              So, what can you give your dog for allergies? Every dog is unique and causes and severity can vary so the answer might be more complicated than you may have thought. Controlling allergies takes some trial and error and usually requires a combination of therapies. Working with your veterinarian, you can discover what to give your dog for allergies and stop the itching for good.


              Dog Allergy FAQs

              dog allergy faqs

              Photo: Chewy Studios, mgstudyo/iStock

              Q: What causes dog allergies?

              A: In dogs, allergies can be caused by pollen, dust, mold, dander, and other allergens, just like in humans. Dogs can also be allergic to flea saliva when they are bitten by fleas, and insect bites and stings. Dogs can also develop allergies to ingredients in their food, resulting in itchy skin and digestion abnormalities.

              Q: Can dog allergies go away?

              A: Once a dog develops an allergy, it typically doesn’t go away on its own. Treatment is aimed at reducing itching and avoiding the offending allergen as much as possible.

              The only way to really minimize allergies is by having a dog tested for allergens and then started on a series of allergy shots, where a dog receives a series of injections that contain very small amounts of allergen, thereby desensitizing the dog to the allergen over time and curing the allergic response. Shots won’t cure allergies, but they can greatly enable the body to get used to them. In time, symptoms will get better, and the pet may not have symptoms as often.

              Q: Can dog allergies cause diarrhea or coughing?

              A: In dogs, the most common symptoms associated with allergies are those related to the skin, i.e., itching, scratching, and hair loss. In some cases, allergies can also affect the digestive system such as when a dog eats something they are allergic to, which can cause skin signs and digestive signs, including vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive gas.

              Q: Can you give a dog Benadryl?

              A: Yes, dogs can tolerate diphenhydramine, which is the active ingredient in Benadryl. The standard dosage is 1 milligram per pound. Not all dogs can tolerate Benadryl, however, and Benadryl may interact with other medications. Always check with your vet before giving your dog Benadryl.

              Q: Can you give a dog Claritin? If so, how much Claritin can I give my dog?

              A: Loratadine, the active ingredients in Claritin, is a safe drug to use in dogs for allergies. Typical dosage is 0.1-.05 mg/pound of body weight. Loratadine can cause side effects and does interact with some other medications and should only be administered under the supervision of a veterinarian. Check with your vet before giving loratadine to your dog, and never give a dog Claritin D because it contains pseudoephedrine.

              Q: What is the difference between Benadryl and Claritin?

              A: While both Benadryl and Claritin are antihistamine medications, the active ingredients are different. Benadryl contains diphenhydramine, and Claritin contains loratadine.

              Q: Can you give dogs Pepto pills?

              A: Pepto-Bismol (bismuth subsalicylate) is safe to offer most dogs; however, salicylates in the medication can, in rare cases, cause gastric bleeding, and the bismuth in the medication often turns stools black. Offer no more than one to two doses after talking to your veterinarian; and if symptoms don’t improve, call your vet.

              Q: Can you give a dog Zyrtec? If so, how much Zyrtec can I give my dog?

              A: The active ingredient in Zyrtec is cetirizine and is a safe drug to use in dogs for allergies. Typical dosage is 0.5 mg/pound of body weight, with a maximum dosage of 20 mg. Cetirizine can cause side effects and does interact with some other medications and should only be administered under the supervision of a veterinarian. Check with your vet before giving cetirizine to your dog, and never give a dog Zyrtec D because it contains pseudoephedrine.


              There are no “stupid” questions when it comes to your pet’s health. If you suspect your pet is sick, please call your vet immediately. For health-related questions, always consult your regular veterinarian when possible as they can make the best recommendations for your pet.

              The post What Can I Give My Dog for Allergies? appeared first on BeChewy.